Five Things: Updates from (after?) Sila Tech

"Sila" has opened (and is amazing, you should see it if you're anywhere near New Hampshire), and the tech process for the show was intense enough for me that nothing else happened for those two weeks, including reading, writing, visiting family, yoga, working out, etc.  I am really and truly ready to go home and see Travis and my kitties, and can honestly say that if I don't see any more snow for another decade, I won't be sad.

1.  Areas that embrace shades of grey - I love staying true to the complexities in life and not oversimplifying issues or existence into patented solutions, talking points and soundbites with which no human can really identify.  The past couple of weeks I have been binge-watching "Continuum" during countless hours of editing, re-editing, rendering, re-rendering, and cueing video for "Sila."  There is true conflict there over what in the given circumstances is the "right" thing to do, and how much of what one wants for one's self and family should be sacrificed for it.  It is difficult to root against the terrorists when you've seen the future they are intent on changing, and it's difficult to against the heroine for not wanting to alter that future and risk her family never existing.  The most interesting parts (to me) of "Sila" involve discussions over arctic policy, Canadian sovereignty, and the governing power of the Inuit, and how these things combine to show that there are far more complex issues at stake than just climate change.  Having seen recently what gross oversimplification of an issue will do, I want to try to make sure that as a member of the left I don't do the same.  I am still deeply concerned about climate change and our nation's (world's?) refusal to address/accept it, but have a bit more of an understanding of how things like a nation's desire to maintain control over the waters closest to its borders and not sit idly while other nations jump in might affect how the issue is addressed.  I am still not understanding or empathetic, however, to our disdain for science and unwillingness to see that we are not ourselves experts in everything, and not all "opinions" are of equal weight.

2.  A longer post is required to talk about my experience last night at Third Rail Project's "Then She Fell," a show I've been wanting to see for a long, long time now, but one important thing I should mention is that this show, in my opinion, is far better than "Sleep No More."  It is tighter, extremely intimate and personal, and for at least half of it I really felt like I was the ONLY audience member.  Without the distraction of 400 people pushing and shoving to get closest to the performers, I was able to focus on their dancing and interactions instead of getting frustrated and walking away.

3.  With "Sila" open, I am going to channel some of my creative energies into several small projects for myself for a bit.  Some of these will be video projects or animations and I will post links as I work on them.  Some of it is getting back to figure drawing and moving into painting.  All of it is a rest from the intensity that has been the "Sila" process since last summer.

4.  Noe Venable is running a Kickstarter for her upcoming album "CASCADIA."  This album's release is one of the things I am most looking forward to in 2014.

5.  It's The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year:  The Fusebox Festival lineup is up and reservations are live!  There are several things I'm really looking forward to this year, not the absolute least of which is the work of Miwa Matreyek.
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