The end is built into the beginning.

After I talked a big game about how seeing theatre is always work, about how for me there is never magic, I had the floor ripped out from under me last night, and it was amazing.

It wasn't immersive either - imagine that.

Last night I saw Andrew Schneider's YOUARENOWHERE at the Walker Arts Center. And I am not over it. It hit me hard, not just because of that thing it did. It had all these allusions to life, death, and time running out, how the end is here before you know it, and well...too soon, that's all I have to say to that.

Photo from andrewjs.com
It wasn't just that, though. It was also the repeated use of David Lynch imagery - I've acknowledged that Lynch is one of the things that has come the closest to possibly "scaring" me, and the uncanny has always had a much deeper effect than any horror element ever has. The first two minutes of this show contained more frightening imagery than an entire 8 months of horror immersive theatre, but that's only if, like me, the above image might give you nightmares.

It was also because it struck the same chord in me that Synecdoche, NY did, nine years ago. I've only seen that film once because I've never wanted to mar that experience with a second viewing. It might be the best film I've ever seen, or ever will see, I don't know that anything has affected me the way it did until maybe this show last night. I bought the DVD and never opened it. I lent it to someone who never watched it and never returned it.


And that's really all that I can say. If you get a chance to see this piece, ever, DO IT. It will haunt me for a long time.

"I will be dying and so will you, and so will everyone here. That's what I want to explore. We're all hurtling towards death, yet here we are for the moment, alive. Each of us knowing we're going to die, each of us secretly believing we won't"

-Synecdoche, NY
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

How much does a heart attack cost? And what does that have to do with NEA cuts and iPhones?

The Problem With Sleep No More's Audience.

It's a beautiful thing, the destruction of words.